Wind Energy

January 22, 2012 by  
Filed under Solar Panel Manufacturers

The Six Obstacles Facing US Wind Energy - Business InsiderAccording to the EIA’s report, Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2010, Wind Energy received subsidies of $4.986 billion from the federal government for Fiscal Year 2010. This amount is equal to approximately half the cost of new wind power installed during that period. State and local subsidies would be in addition.

Wind blows when it chooses, which is often not when it is needed most. In theory, this problem could be resolved with robust long-distance transmission of electricity and with adequate electrical storage, but in the US, these are not available. Bill Richardson, energy secretary under Bill Clinton has said, ‘We’re a superpower with a Third World grid.’ This means that even in locations where Wind Energy makes up a relatively large share of the fuel mix, other types of generations must be available to supply almost the full level of demand, if the wind is not blowing.

(The US Wind Energy Association shows that 6034 megawatts of new capacity was installed between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010, so the subsidy per megawatt was $826,318. This compares to an average cost per megawatt of about $1.4 million, excluding construction and connection costs.).

The Oil Drum | Obstacles Facing US Wind EnergyClass 1 railroads had 480 revenue ton-miles of freight moved per gallon of diesel fuel burned in 2009. 92.5% of ton-miles of U.S. coal freight moved by rail in 2007 (an additional 3.3% of ton-miles were multi-mode with rail being one of the modes).

I suppose a politically divided country cannot come up with big, bold plans for the future, as Eisenhower did when he launched the interstate highway system. I was struck recently by the route map for the Keystone XL pipeline, which runs right down through the region holding the greatest Wind Energy resources. We should be considering construction of a new-technology superconducting electric power corridor alongside Keystone as part of a 21st century grid rebuild. An east-west corridor could come later. A north-south conduit could tap not only wind, but mine-site coalfired power, with the CO2 used for natural gas and oil extraction in the high plains. I’m no fan of coal as it is currently hauled on railroads and burned, but Western coal is certainly more eco-friendly than mountaintop removal of high-sulfur coal from Appalachia. (I’ve toured restored coal extraction sites in eastern Montana and you can’t tell we were there.) The tremendous wind resource in places like Wyoming paired with gas turbine demand plants can combine to make something close to base load. And cryogenic transmission goes a long way toward eliminating the distance leeches. Sure it’s expensive, but amortized over a century, not so much. But, sad to say, we have no Eisenhower around today.

The average trip distance for coal by rail was 428 miles (yes, some trips are longer than average). 428/480 = 0.89 gallons of diesel burned per trip-ton of coal moved. There are roughly 17 million BTU in a ton of Powder River coal (which is a lower value than the average for U.S. coal). There are roughly 130,000 BTU in a gallon of diesel. Less than 1% of the energy contained in U.S. coal is consumed in rail transport of coal in the U.S. Even for a tiny fraction of VERY long rail trips, the energy consumed is less than 5%. If the diesel used in moving coal is of concern it would be dramatically cheaper to convert the existing locomotives to LNG than to spend any money building coal plants or transmission to move generation closer to mines. Rail, including all loads, uses about 1% of U.S. petroleum consumption. Oh, as noted the average BTU of coal is higher than used in the analysis, the carload weight of coal is higher than railroad average (to the extent that aluminum cars are built to increase net loads), and most coal moves in unit trains, therefore the fuel efficiency per ton-mile is also likely higher for coal.

Wind energy job fair continues today - - - Valley Morning StarRAYMONDVILLE ‘ Eager job-seekers lined up around American Legion Post 390 Wednesday to apply for about 120 construction jobs at Duke Energy’s Los Vientos Wind power project, Willacy County Judge John F. Gonzales Jr. said.

‘They were lined up around the building and all the way around to the back alley’ Gonzales said about 2 p.m. The job fair will continue today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the American Legion hall, 211 W. Hidalgo Ave. ‘It’s being held by the contractor, Wanzek Construction and Texas Workforce Solutions,’ Duke spokeswoman Alanya Schofield said. ‘The jobs are general construction jobs, laborers, heavy equipment operators and people with rebar/concrete skills.’ The contractor plans to hire 30 people in February and 60 to 90 by April, with additional hiring possible, she said. Although permanent jobs may be few after completion of construction for the Duke and E.ON Energy Wind farm projects, the construction activity taking place this year will be a much-needed boost for a county with a 13.7 percent unemployment rate, as of November, Gonzales said. There will also be many spin-off benefits for local restaurants, hotels and stores, he said. Jobs are also being created at the Port of Brownsville, as steel products and Wind generator components are shipped from China and Europe for the $400 million project, the judge said. E.ON Energy, a German-based multi-national corporation, started construction in November for its Wind farm project east of Raymondville, company officials said. The interest in the job fair shows the stress the Rio Grande Valley economy has been enduring, the county judge said. Putting people to work is always a positive sign, he said. ‘I bet half the people in line were from Cameron County,’ Gonzales said of the job-seekers gathered at the American Legion building Wednesday. Between the two Wind farm projects, about $700 million to $800 million in construction will be taking place, with completion for both scheduled by the end of this year, the judge said. Other spin-offs for the Valley economy include purchase of local materials such as concrete, reinforcement bar, road paving materials and other goods and services, Gonzales said. When hotels in Raymondville fill up, workers may stay in Harlingen or other nearby cities, he said. During a meeting Wednesday with Duke officials, he and other county officials discussed the standards that Duke’s contractors will need to use to repair and replace county roads that will be affected by heavy use during Duke’s construction of the Wind farm project, the county judge said. George Solis, commander of American Legion Post 390, said Wednesday afternoon that job seekers were still lined up waiting for a chance to submit their applications. ‘I drove by there and the line is still all the way around the building,’ he said.

EWEA Blog ?» Wind energy photography competition opens today!Erik Luntang, well-known photographer and part of the jury for the competition, said: ‘living in a big city, I know the importance of finding other energy sources to replace fossil fuels. I grew up on a small Danish island which is now self-sufficient in electricity thanks to Wind Energy. There is no better way than pictures to spread the message that Wind Energy is the future for a more environmentally friendly and sustainable source of energy.’.

One winner will receive the ’1,000 voucher, and five runners-up stand to receive ’250 Amazon vouchers. All winning photos will be displayed in a photo exhibition held in the EU area of Brussels, and the overall winning photo will become part of an online professional photography collection, www.hardrainproject.com as well as featuring in renewable energy newspaper ‘Recharge’ and in EU Wind Energy industry magazine ‘Wind Directions’.

“We need all the elements of Energy..it has a very vital role in that mixture. I think it will continue to grow and I think it will be strong and once we complete the KRESS transmission (lines) buildup, we’ll continue to see the growth,” said Sadler. “Will we see it grow like we did back in 2007-2008., No.

But during the next 5 years, once the KRESS lines are completed, 2013, I think we’ll fill them up.”.

about Clean Wind Energy, Inc.Clean Wind Energy, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc., has designed and is preparing to develop and construct large ‘Downdraft Towers’ that use benevolent, non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity and clean water economically by integrating and synthesizing numerous proven as well as emerging technologies. in addition to constructing Downdraft Towers in the United States and abroad, the Company intends to establish partnerships at home and abroad to propagate these systems and meet increasing global demand for clean water and electricity. Clean Wind has assembled a team of experienced business professionals, engineers and scientists with access to the breakthrough energy research upon which this technology is founded and the proven ability to bring the idea to market.

Cautionary Note regarding Forward-Looking StatementsStatements included in this release may constitute ‘forward-looking statements’ within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties such as competitive factors, technological development, market demand and the Company’s ability to obtain new contracts and accurately estimate net revenues due to variability in size, scope and duration of projects, and internal issues in the sponsoring client. further information on potential factors that could affect the Company’s financial results, can be found in the Company’s various filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Clean Wind has filed several patents that the Company believes will further enhance this potentially revolutionary technology. Clean Wind Energy, Inc. is based in Annapolis MD, and is traded on the OTCBB under the symbol ‘CWET’. Once you have registered your name and email address you will have been sent a log in for the one way link building service.

Clean Wind Energy, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc., has designed and is preparing to develop and construct large “Downdraft Towers” that use benevolent, non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity and clean water economically by integrating and synthesizing numerous proven as well as emerging technologies. In addition to constructing Downdraft Towers in the United States and abroad, the Company intends to establish partnerships at home and abroad to propagate these systems and meet increasing global demand for clean water and electricity. Clean Wind has assembled a team of experienced business professionals, engineers and scientists with access to the breakthrough energy research upon which this technology is founded and the proven ability to bring the idea to market.

Statements included in this release may constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties such as competitive factors, technological development, market demand and the Company’s ability to obtain new contracts and accurately estimate net revenues due to variability in size, scope and duration of projects, and internal issues in the sponsoring client. Further information on potential factors that could affect the Company’s financial results, can be found in the Company’s various filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Clean Wind has filed several patents that the Company believes will further enhance this potentially revolutionary technology. Clean Wind Energy, Inc. is based in Annapolis MD, and is traded on the OTCBB under the symbol ‘CWET’.

More Than Just a Breeze A paper published in the science journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) estimates the total global Wind Energy potential at 2,470 exajoules (EJ) or about 40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity. The U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that worldwide demand for non-fossil fuel sources, such as solar and wind, will increase 22% over the next five years and 85% over the next 25.

Finally, ball-bearing manufacturers such as Kaydon (NYSE:KDN) and Federal-Mogul (Nasdaq:FDML) are seeing their stars shine as more wind products are being built across the globe. The Bottom Line Renewable energy is facing a vacuum of confidence from most investors. However, the long-term promise is great. One shining example in the space is the Wind Energy sector. Capacity continues to grow and offers a value among the renewable energy sectors. The previous stocks, along with Woodward, (Nasdaq:WWD) make ideal choices. (For additional reading, see Going Green With Exchange-Traded Funds.).

The global wind industry is bent on making those targets and saw a major revival in new capacity during 2011. More than 18.4 gigawatts (GW) worth of new capacity has been installed globally in the first half of 2011, and 25.5 GW is expected to be added in the second half of the year. So far, global wind capacity grew by 9.3% in 2011.

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